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Version: v3.x.x

Quick Start

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You can use the Lit network to encrypt your data and store it privately on the open web. This guide will show you how you can encrypt a simple message with Lit, create an Access Control Condition (ACC), and permit decryption by users who meet the condition you set.

Lit can only be used to generate and store encryption keys, so you will need to store the ciphertext and metadata yourself using your storage provider of choice (such as IPFS, Arweave, or even a centralized storage solution). Once your data has been encrypted, the Lit network will enforce who is allowed to decrypt it.

This guide uses Lit's Habanero Network, the Mainnet Beta, which is designed for application developers aiming to build production-ready applications. For those developing in a test environment, the Manzano Network is recommended. More on Lit networks here.

For developers looking to explore beyond the basics, check out Advanced Topics.

Install and Import the Lit SDK

Ensure you have the following requirements in place:

  1. Operating System: Linux, Mac OS, or Windows.
  2. Development Environment: You'll need an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) installed. We recommend Visual Studio Code.
  3. Languages: The Lit JS SDK V4 supports JavaScript. Make sure you have the appropriate language environment set up.
  4. Internet Connection: A stable internet connection is required for installation, updates, and interacting with the Lit nodes.

Install the @lit-protocol/lit-node-client package, which can be used in both browser and Node environments:

You should use at least Node v19.9.0 for

  • crypto support.
  • webcrypto library support if targeting web.
yarn add @lit-protocol/lit-node-client

OR

npm i @lit-protocol/lit-node-client
note

If you are using NodeJS you should install @lit-protocol/lit-node-client-nodejs

Use the Lit JS SDK V4:

import * as LitJsSdk from "@lit-protocol/lit-node-client";
note

You should use at least Node vv19.9.0 because of the need for crypto support..

You also need to install the following lit packages whose functions are used in the example below:

  • @lit-protocol/constants
  • @lit-protocol/auth-helpers
  • @lit-protocol/contracts-sdk

Client-Side Usage

Within a file (in the Lit example repos it will likely be called lit.js), set up your Lit class. Running litNodeClient.connect() will return a promise that resolves when you are connected to the Lit Network.

import * as LitJsSdk from "@lit-protocol/lit-node-client";
import { LitNetwork } from "@lit-protocol/constants";

class Lit {
litNodeClient;
chain;

constructor(chain){
this.chain = chain;
}

async connect() {
this.litNodeClient = new LitJsSdk.LitNodeClient({
litNetwork: LitNetwork.Cayenne,
});
await this.litNodeClient.connect();
}
}

const chain = "ethereum";

let myLit = new Lit(chain);
await myLit.connect();

The litNodeClient listens to network state, and those listeners will keep your litNodeClient running until you explicitly disconnect from the Lit network. To stop the litNodeClient listeners and allow the browser to disconnect gracefully, call:

await this.litNodeClient.disconnect();
note

To avoid errors from Lit nodes due to stale authSig or sessionSigs, make sure to clear the local storage for authSig and sessionSigs before reconnecting or restarting the litNodeClient.

One way to do this is to disconnect the existing litNodeClient first and then reconnect. To disconnect the litNodeClient after making a connection, call the following function:

await this.litNodeClient.disconnect();

Other way is to simply call disconnectWeb3 function which will clear up the local storage for authSig and sessionSigs:

LitJsSdk.disconnectWeb3();

Server-Side Usage

In this example stub, the litNodeClient is stored in a global variable app.locals.litNodeClient so that it can be used throughout the server. Note that app.locals is provided by Express for this purpose. You may have to use what your own server framework provides for this purpose, instead.

note

If you are using NodeJS you should install @lit-protocol/lit-node-client-nodejs. Moreover, the server-side implementation, the litNodeClient class is named LitNodeClientNodeJs.

Running litNodeClient.connect() will return a promise that resolves when you are connected to the Lit network.

import * as LitJsSdk from "@lit-protocol/lit-node-client";
import { LitNetwork } from "@lit-protocol/constants";

class Lit {
litNodeClient;
chain;

constructor(chain){
this.chain = chain;
}

async connect() {
app.locals.litNodeClient = new LitJsSdk.LitNodeClientNodeJs({
alertWhenUnauthorized: false,
litNetwork: LitNetwork.Cayenne,
debug: true,
});

this.litNodeClient = app.locals.litNodeClient;
await this.litNodeClient.connect();
}
}

const chain = "ethereum";

let myLit = new Lit(chain);
await myLit.connect();

The litNodeClient listens to network state, and those listeners will keep your Node.js process running until you explicitly disconnect from the Lit network. To stop the litNodeClient listeners and allow node to exit gracefully, call: 

await this.litNodeClient.disconnect();

Performing Encryption

To encrypt something with Lit, you’ll need to follow these steps:

  1. Create an access control condition.
  2. Encrypt the static content (string, file, zip, etc...) using LitJsSdk.encryptString to get the ciphertext and dataToEncryptHash.
  3. Finally, store the ciphertextdataToEncryptHash and other metadata (accessControlConditions or other conditions such asevmContractConditions) and chain using your storage provider of choice.

Create an Access Control Condition

In this example, our ACC will check if a wallet (:userAddress) has at least 0.000001 ETH on ethereum at the latest block:

const accessControlConditions = [
{
contractAddress: "",
standardContractType: "",
chain: "ethereum",
method: "eth_getBalance",
parameters: [":userAddress", "latest"],
returnValueTest: {
comparator: ">=",
value: "1000000000000", // 0.000001 ETH
},
},
];

Encryption

To encrypt a string, use one of the following functions:

  • encryptString() - Used to encrypt the raw string.
  • zipAndEncryptString() - Compresses the string (using JSZip) before encrypting it. This is useful for saving space, but takes additional time to perform the zip.

To encrypt a file, use:

  • encryptFile() - Used to encrypt a file without doing any zipping or packing. Because zipping larger files takes time, this function is useful when encrypting large files ( > 20mb). This also requires that you store the file metadata.
  • encryptFileAndZipWithMetadata() - Used to encrypt a file and then zip it up with the metadata (using JSZip). This is useful for when you don't want to store the file metadata separately.
  • zipAndEncryptFiles() - Used to zip and encrypt multiple files. This does not include the file metadatas in the zip, so you must store those yourself.

Apart from these, we have one more function which can be used to encrypt both strings and files:

  • encryptToJson() - Used to encrypt a string or file and serialise all the metadata required to decrypt i.e. accessControlConditions, evmContractConditions, solRpcConditions, unifiedAccessControlConditions & chain to JSON. It is useful for encrypting/decrypting data in IPFS or other storage without compressing it in a ZIP file.

Encryption can be performed entirely client-side and doesn't require making a request to the Lit nodes.

In this example, we are using encryptString():

note

All encryption functions will output the ciphertext and a hash of the plaintext data (dataToEncryptHash) as base64 encoded strings, both of which are used during decryption.

class Lit {
...

async encrypt(message) {
// Encrypt the message
const { ciphertext, dataToEncryptHash } = await LitJsSdk.encryptString(
{
accessControlConditions,
dataToEncrypt: message,
},
this.litNodeClient,
);

// Return the ciphertext and dataToEncryptHash
return {
ciphertext,
dataToEncryptHash,
};
}

...
}
note

Both ciphertext and dataToEncryptHash will be base64 encoded strings.

Performing Decryption

Make sure we have accessControlConditionsciphertext, and the dataToEncryptHash data we created during the encryption step. An exception is when using encryptFileAndZipWithMetadata() which will include this metadata in the zip.

There is just one step:

  1. Obtain the decrypted data in plaintext using the sessionSigsaccessControlConditionsciphertext, and dataToEncryptHash by calling LitJsSdk.decryptToString.

Mint Capacity Credits

In order to execute a transaction with Lit, you’ll need to reserve capacity on the network using Capacity Credits. These allow holders to reserve a set number of requests (requests per second) over a desired period of time (i.e. one week). You can mint a Capacity Credit NFT using the contracts-sdk in a couple of easy steps.

First, ensure you have the @lit-protocol/contracts-sdk package installed, which can be used in both browser and Node environments:

yarn add @lit-protocol/contracts-sdk

OR

npm i @lit-protocol/contracts-sdk

The next step is to initialize a signer. This should be a wallet controlled by your application and the same wallet you’ll use to mint the Capacity Credit NFT:

const walletWithCapacityCredit = new Wallet("<your private key or mnemonic>");

let contractClient = new LitContracts({
signer: dAppOwnerWallet,
network: 'habanero',
});

await contractClient.connect();

After you’ve set your wallet, your next step is to mint the NFT:

// this identifier will be used in delegation requests. 
const { capacityTokenIdStr } = await contractClient.mintCapacityCreditsNFT({
requestsPerKilosecond: 80,
// requestsPerDay: 14400,
// requestsPerSecond: 10,
daysUntilUTCMidnightExpiration: 2,
});

In the above example, we are configuring 2 properties:

  • requestsPerDay - How many requests can be sent in a 24 hour period.
  • daysUntilUTCMidnightExpiration - The number of days until the nft will expire. expiration will occur at UTC Midnight of the day specified.

Once you mint your NFT you will be able to send X many requests per day where X is the number specified in requestsPerDay. Once the Capacity Credit is minted the tokenId can be used in delegation requests.

Delegate usage of your NFT

Once you have minted a Capacity Credits NFT, you can delegate usage of it to the PKP we minted earlier. This will allow the delegatee address(es) to use it to make requests to the Lit nodes (in this case, to make a decryption request).

const { capacityDelegationAuthSig } =
await litNodeClient.createCapacityDelegationAuthSig({
uses: '1',
signer: wallet,
capacityTokenId: capacityTokenIdStr,
delegateeAddresses: [walletAddress],
});

To delegate your Rate Limit NFT there are 4 properties to configure:

  • uses - How many times the delegation may be used
  • dAppOwnerWallet - The owner of the wallet as an ethers Wallet instance
  • capacityTokenId - The token identifier of the Rate Limit NFT
  • delegateeAddresses - The wallet addresses which will be delegated to
note

The delegateeAddress parameter is optional. If omitted, anyone can use your capacityDelegationAuthSig to use your app without restrictions. In this case, you can utilize other restrictions like the uses param to limit the amount of usage by your users.

Check out a complete example here.

Obtain a Session Sigs

In order to interact with the nodes in the Lit Network, you will need to generate and present session signatures. The easiest way to do this is to generate a SessionSigs.

SessionSigs are produced by a ed25519 keypair that is generated randomly on the browser and stored in local storage. We need to obtain an AuthSig through an authentication method like Ethereum wallet in order to get a SessionSigs from Lit Nodes.

The session keypair is used to sign all requests to the Lit Nodes, and the user's AuthSig is sent along with the request, attached as a "capability" to the session signature. Each node in the Lit Network receives a unique signature for each request, and can verify that the user owns the wallet address that signed the capability.

note

Be sure to use the latest block hash from the litNodeClient as the nonce. You can get it from the litNodeClient.getLatestBlockhash(). Without the block hash SessionSigs will not be validated.

Obtain a SessionSigs in the browser

If you want to obtain a SessionSigs in the browser, you can instantiate an ethers.Signer to sign a SIWE message and then generate an AuthSig to get the SessionSigs as shown below:

import {ethers} from "ethers";
import {
LitAccessControlConditionResource,
LitAbility,
createSiweMessageWithRecaps,
generateAuthSig,
} from "@lit-protocol/auth-helpers";

class Lit {
...

async getSessionSignatures(){
// Connect to the wallet
const provider = new ethers.providers.Web3Provider(window.ethereum);
await provider.send("eth_requestAccounts", []);
const signer = provider.getSigner();
const walletAddress = await signer.getAddress();
console.log("Connected account:", walletAddress);

// Get the latest blockhash
const latestBlockhash = await this.litNodeClient.getLatestBlockhash();

// Define the authNeededCallback function
const authNeededCallback = async(params) => {
if (!params.uri) {
throw new Error("uri is required");
}
if (!params.expiration) {
throw new Error("expiration is required");
}

if (!params.resourceAbilityRequests) {
throw new Error("resourceAbilityRequests is required");
}

// Create the SIWE message
const toSign = await createSiweMessageWithRecaps({
uri: params.uri,
expiration: params.expiration,
resources: params.resourceAbilityRequests,
walletAddress: walletAddress,
nonce: latestBlockhash,
litNodeClient: this.litNodeClient,
});

// Generate the authSig
const authSig = await generateAuthSig({
signer: signer,
toSign,
});

return authSig;
}

// Define the Lit resource
const litResource = new LitAccessControlConditionResource('*');

// Get the session signatures
const sessionSigs = await this.litNodeClient.getSessionSigs({
chain: this.chain,
resourceAbilityRequests: [
{
resource: litResource,
ability: LitAbility.AccessControlConditionDecryption,
},
],
authNeededCallback,
capacityDelegationAuthSig,
});
return sessionSigs;
}

...
}

Obtain a SessionSigs on the server-side

If you want to obtain a SessionSigs on the server-side, you can instantiate an ethers.wallet to sign a SIWE message and then generate an AuthSig to get the SessionSigs as shown below:

import {ethers} from "ethers";
import {
LitAccessControlConditionResource,
LitAbility,
createSiweMessageWithRecaps,
generateAuthSig,
} from "@lit-protocol/auth-helpers";

class Lit {
...

async getSessionSignatures(){
// Connect to the wallet
const ethWallet = new ethers.Wallet(
"<your private key>"
);

// Get the latest blockhash
const latestBlockhash = await this.litNodeClient.getLatestBlockhash();

// Define the authNeededCallback function
const authNeededCallback = async(params) => {
if (!params.uri) {
throw new Error("uri is required");
}
if (!params.expiration) {
throw new Error("expiration is required");
}

if (!params.resourceAbilityRequests) {
throw new Error("resourceAbilityRequests is required");
}

// Create the SIWE message
const toSign = await createSiweMessageWithRecaps({
uri: params.uri,
expiration: params.expiration,
resources: params.resourceAbilityRequests,
walletAddress: ethWallet.address,
nonce: latestBlockhash,
litNodeClient: this.litNodeClient,
});

// Generate the authSig
const authSig = await generateAuthSig({
signer: ethWallet,
toSign,
});

return authSig;
}

// Define the Lit resource
const litResource = new LitAccessControlConditionResource('*');

// Get the session signatures
const sessionSigs = await this.litNodeClient.getSessionSigs({
chain: this.chain,
resourceAbilityRequests: [
{
resource: litResource,
ability: LitAbility.AccessControlConditionDecryption,
},
],
authNeededCallback,
capacityDelegationAuthSig,
});
return sessionSigs;
}

...
}

Using a delegated capacityDelegationAuthSig from a backend

If using a mainnet in order to keep the wallet which holds the Capacity Credit NFT secure it is recommended to call createCapacityDelegationAuthSig from LitNodeClient in a backend context. There are a few recommended web servers you can use in order to host an api endpoint which can return the capacityDelegationAuthSig . Some links are provided below to help get started:

Decryption

To decrypt use the following functions depending on the function used to encrypt:

In the example, we used encryptString() to encrypt so we will use decryptToString() to decrypt. Pass in the data accessControlConditionsciphertextdataToEncryptHash, and authSig.

note

If you want to use another LitJsSDK encryption method to encrypt content, you will need to use the appropriate decrypt method.

class Lit {
...

async decrypt(ciphertext, dataToEncryptHash) {
// Get the session signatures
const sessionSigs = await this.getSessionSignatures();

// Decrypt the message
const decryptedString = await LitJsSdk.decryptToString(
{
accessControlConditions,
chain: this.chain,
ciphertext,
dataToEncryptHash,
sessionSigs,
},
this.litNodeClient,
);

// Return the decrypted string
return { decryptedString };
}

...
}

Learn More

By now you should have successfully created an Access Control Condition and performed encryption and decryption. To learn more about using decentralized access control, please check out the links below:

  1. JWT-based Access Control.
  2. Basic Conditions.
  3. Off-Chain Conditions.
  4. Custom Contract Calls.
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